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Dementia


Help with Dementia in later life.

The simplest of actions, things we do apparently without thinking, still require many functions of the brain. Just making a phone call, for example, involves multiple functions, including things like choosing to make the call (motivation), remembering the number (long term memory), remembering the conversation as it progresses (short term memory), and deciding when to end the call (decision making).

We all forget a phone number from time to time, but forgetting how to use the phone entirely, or problems with the many steps and functions involved could suggest the early stages of dementia. This is a deterioration of brain function that starts slowly before progressing over time. With an early diagnosis, people with dementia can still lead a good and fulfilling life.

Find out more about Dementia

What are the symptoms?

Dementia usually starts slowly and progresses over a number of years. In the early stages, people may not realise anything is wrong. Different types of dementia exhibit different symptoms, and even two people with the same type of dementia can contrast markedly. However at some point most people will experience:

  • memory loss, especially of recent events
  • difficulty with finding the right words and following conversations
  • changes in behaviour or personality
  • problems carrying out everyday tasks like cooking and driving

Some of the symptoms also occur in other conditions (like depression, anxiety or stroke), so it is important to be diagnosed by a doctor with the appropriate skills.

What are the causes?

The most common causes of dementia are:

  • Alzheimer’s disease (60% of all dementia) – caused by a protein in the brain resulting in slowly progressive deterioration
  • vascular dementia (25% of all dementia, sometimes also occurring with Alzheimer’s disease) – due to problems with blood supply to the brain
  • Lewy body dementia (5%) – visual hallucinations and symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (shaking and stiffness) are common in this condition
  • fronto-temporal dementia (2%) – which often causes changes in behaviour (irritability, disinhibition, impulsiveness), poor judgement, language problems and changes in mood before memory is affected

Key facts about dementia

  • There are over 750,000 people with dementia in the UK
  • Over 1/3 never get a diagnosis
  • Six people in 10 living in care homes have dementia
  • People live on average 8 years after diagnosis
  • Some causes of dementia are treatable

How will it affect me?

The effects of Dementia vary widely between people and it progresses differently in individual cases. You may notice very little to begin with, but as the condition progresses you, or people around you, may notice that changes in memory, thinking and behaviour affect work and social activities, driving, and domestic activities such as cooking and dressing. There is also an increased risk of depression and anxiety.

How is it diagnosed?

There are no simple tests for dementia. Doctors will want to hear how symptoms have progressed over time, ideally from the person concerned and a relative. The doctor will also check various aspects of brain function such as memory, use of language and recognition. They will probably organise some blood tests and a brain scan. Sometimes the doctor will ask for a further assessment by a psychologist or occupational therapist. After diagnosis it is best to have regular reviews, as the challenges and difficulties that dementia causes will change over time.

What is the treatment for dementia?

For some types of dementia (e.g. Alzheimer’s disease) a medicine, known as a cholinesterase inhibitor, increases a chemical in the brain that can help improve memory and reduce confusion. Activities that stimulate the brain are also very helpful in improving memory for some people.

Depression, anxiety, hallucinations and changes in behaviour may also improve with treatment. People with dementia need advice and help to stay fit and healthy and extra monitoring of their general health such as blood pressure and heart health.

Many people with dementia benefit from help, advice and support to plan for the future and to live a good life with the condition.

As the years pass, eventually people may need homecare to help with daily tasks such as washing and cooking.

What do I do now?

If you are worried that you or someone close to you may have dementia, it is important to have a medical assessment to confirm the diagnosis and the type of dementia, and to discuss treatment options.

We’re Red & Yellow Care, the
health experts for later life.

At Red & Yellow Care we specialise in diagnosis, treatment, care and advice for older adults. Our approach is unique – we build a complete picture of the individual – and we treat them like an individual. We guarantee fast and flexible appointments with the very best specialists.

Meet some of our consultants.

Dr James Warner

Consultant Psychiatrist

Psychiatry

Dr Hema Ananth

Consultant Psychiatrist

Psychiatry

Dr Alex Bailey

Consultant Psychiatrist

Psychiatry

Dr Alan Smith

Consultant Psychiatrist

Psychiatry

Dr Giovanna Zamboni

Consultant Neurologist

Neurology

How we can help.

Because we are the specialists in health for older adults, we can offer all the expertise you need from one source.

We usually visit you at home, or alternatively can see you at our Consulting Rooms. We aim to arrange all appointments within a matter of days.

Clear and simple pricing.


First appointment up to 90 minutes, priced at £450.

Further appointments at £300 up to 60 minutes, £200 up to 30 minutes.

Home visit supplements starting from £100.

Get started now

Smarter, faster, easier and
more thorough healthcare.

Expert

We have the best consultants and other specialists dedicated to the health of older people.

Fast

We aim for our specialists to see you within a matter of days, and within 24 hours for urgent appointments.

Flexible

We fit our service around you. Planning your appointments where and when suits you best.

Comprehensive

We are committed to
giving you the most thorough assessment, treatment and care.

Request an appointment today.

prev next
  • My decisions, greatly helped by my wife, family and friends, were also sustained by the team from Red & Yellow Care.
    Bernard – person with dementia
  • The fact that you promised to tailor your service around my mother and give full and constant support was very attractive and not something we had come across previously.
    Matt – son and carer
  • Red & Yellow’s open discussions and the advice given to me and my wife were professional, friendly, patient, clear and supportive without didacticism or jargon. At all times I felt that I was part of a team, even if I was a little slow.
    Robert – person with dementia
  • I have got my dad back. We’ve seen massive improvements – his morning confusion is gone, he’s not forgetful or perplexed, and his motivation has improved.
    Natalie – daughter and carer
  • The meeting on Wednesday evening eased my sore heart and deep anxiety about George, as I know how fortunate we are to have found you all.
    Teresa – sister and carer

    Download a free PDF - A Good Life with Dementia

    Enter your email address below to receive your free copy of ‘A Good Life with Dementia’. The PDF will be delivered to your email.

    Download our free report - A Good Life with Dementia

    Lewy body dementia


    Help with Lewy body dementia in later life.

    You are sitting watching TV when you notice a cat on the chair next to you, which bursts into flames. You glance away, then back – it has gone. This could be a symptom of Lewy Body Dementia. This relatively rare form of dementia can cause visual hallucinations, as well as confusion and memory loss that fluctuate dramatically from day to day. Stiffness and shaking, similar to Parkinson’s Disease, can also be symptoms.

    Lewy Body Dementia develops slowly over the years. With an early and accurate diagnosis, help can be given so that those with the condition can have a good and fulfilling life.

     

    Find out more about Lewy body dementia

    What are the symptoms?

    Common symptoms of Lewy Body Dementia include:

    • memory loss, particularly of recent events
    • confusion which fluctuates day to day
    • visual hallucinations
    • shaking or feeling stiff
    • increased falls
    • feelings of anxiousness or depression
    • changes in personality and behaviour

    What causes it?

    The cause of Lewy Body Dementia is not known. People with this condition have microscopic particles in their brains called Lewy bodies. These contain clumps of a naturally occurring brain chemical called alpha synuclein but scientists have not yet worked out why this chemical is deposited in the brain.

    Key facts about Lewy body dementia

    • Of the 750,000 people with dementia in the UK, around 30,000 will have Lewy Body Dementia.
    • The risk of developing Lewy Body Dementia increases with age
    • The condition is very similar to dementia caused by Parkinson’s disease.
    • Some medicines should not be given to people with Lewy Body Dementia, so an early and accurate diagnosis is important.

    How will it affect me?

    People with Lewy body dementia may not be aware of any problems and may not want help, it is others around them who notice changes. The problems with movement such as stiffness and tremor may affect day-to-day tasks such as walking, writing and dressing. The confusion and changes in concentration and alertness (which tend to come and go in severity) can also affect daily living and place a strain on relatives and friends. As the illness progresses over years people may need more and more help.

    How is it diagnosed?

    Some of the symptoms also occur in other conditions (like depression, anxiety or Parkinson’s Disease), so it is important to be diagnosed by a doctor with the appropriate skills.

    Assessment involves taking an account of your symptoms and how they developed, your background and current circumstances and the results of brain-function tests and a brain scan such as an MRI. A specialist brain scan called a PET scan can also help in some instances.

    How is it treated?

    There are drug treatments available for Lewy Body Dementia called cholinesterase inhibitors. These may help improve memory and reduce confusion but do not stop the illness progressing. They do not work for everyone but for some people the effects are very good. The doctor will want to monitor how you are responding to the treatment.

    Most people with Lewy Body Dementia will have additional symptoms such as visual hallucinations or feeling anxious. Changes in behaviour such as losing motivation, or becoming excitable, especially at night during sleep, also need specialist assessment and treatment.

    People with Lewy Body Dementia and their families and friends need a lot of support, practical help and education to help them understand the diagnosis, how the illness will progress, how to plan for the future and how to get help now. A specialist should be able to help put you in touch with people that can help.

    We’re Red & Yellow Care, the
    health experts for later life.

    At Red & Yellow Care we specialise in diagnosis, treatment, care and advice for older adults. Our approach is unique – we build a complete picture of the individual – and we treat them like an individual. We guarantee fast and flexible appointments with the very best specialists.

    Meet some of our consultants.

    Dr James Warner

    Consultant Psychiatrist

    Psychiatry

    Dr Hema Ananth

    Consultant Psychiatrist

    Psychiatry

    Dr Brian Parsons

    Consultant Psychiatrist

    Psychiatry

    Dr Giovanna Zamboni

    Consultant Neurologist

    Neurology

    How we can help.

    Because we are the specialists in health for older adults, we can offer all the expertise you need from one source.

    We usually visit you at home, or alternatively can see you at our Consulting Rooms. We aim to arrange all appointments within a matter of days.

    Clear and simple pricing.


    First appointment up to 90 minutes, priced at £450.

    Further appointments at £300 up to 60 minutes, £200 up to 30 minutes.

    Home visit supplements starting from £100.

    Get started now

    Smarter, faster, easier and
    more thorough healthcare.

    Expert

    We have the best consultants and other specialists dedicated to the health of older people.

    Fast

    We aim for our specialists to see you within a matter of days, and within 24 hours for urgent appointments.

    Flexible

    We fit our service around you. Planning your appointments where and when suits you best.

    Comprehensive

    We are committed to giving you the most thorough assessment, treatment and care.

    prev next
    • Red & Yellow have made a huge difference to my life. I no longer feel I am fighting a battle alone. They have given me help, guidance and the strength to support my husband.

      Rebecca – wife and carer
    • I have got my dad back. We’ve seen massive improvements – his morning confusion is gone, he’s not forgetful or perplexed, and his motivation has improved.

      Natalie – daughter and carer
    • The meeting on Wednesday evening eased my sore heart and deep anxiety about George, as I know how fortunate we are to have found you all.

      Teresa – sister and carer

      Request an appointment today.

      Fronto-temporal dementia


      Help with Fronto-temporal dementia in later life.

      Suppose you are alone at night and the electricity cuts out. You’d find a torch, check the fuse box and ring the electricity supplier. This is not a solution you’d have learned – your brain would easily be able to come up with it there and then. But in the case of someone with fronto-temporal Dementia, creating solutions to unexpected or new experiences may be a struggle.

      This form of dementia, affecting the front parts of the brain, is relatively rare. Your memory may remain normal, but your behaviour or personality may change. Because it develops very slowly, early diagnosis is important to help people adapt to and live with the changes they are experiencing.

      Find out more about Fronto-temporal dementia

      What are the symptoms?

      Symptoms usually start very slowly and develop over time. Common symptoms of Fronto-Temporal Dementia include:

      • inability to think flexibly or cope with new situations
      • impulsiveness
      • argumentativeness and aggression
      • sexual inappropriateness and loss of inhibitions
      • obsessiveness
      • disorganisation and inability to care for oneself
      • speech problems

      What are the causes?

      The cause is not known, but there are probably a number of them. In some cases a protein called tau accumulates in the brain. Some (but by no means all) are inherited through faulty genes. Picks Disease is a subtype of Fronto-Temporal Dementia.

      Key facts about Fronto-Temporal Dementia

      • It is a relatively rare cause of dementia; affecting around 18,000 people in the UK
      • It affects younger people compared to most other types of dementia – usually starting when people are in their 50s or 60s.
      • The early symptoms are subtle and may be put down to “mid-life crisis”
      • It is genetically inherited in about 10% of cases
      • There are three subtypes: Behavioural Variant; Aphasic and Semantic Dementia

      How will it affect me?

      People with Fronto-Temporal Dementia are unlikely to be aware of the problems they face and may not be keen to seek help. However those around them will notice problems with work, especially when this involves concentrating or making decisions; problems with social interactions (often with family and friends being alienated because of rudeness or irritability) and difficulty with doing day-to-day tasks. The problems will be subtle in the first few years. The effects will vary depending on the condition; the Behavioural Subtype may result in impulsive or disinhibited behaviour or apathy; Aphasic Subtype means people have problems speaking fluently and in the Semantic Subtype people lose understanding for words.

      How is it diagnosed?

       Some of the symptoms of Fronto-Temporal Dementia also occur in other conditions (like depression, mania, or anxiety) so it is important to see a doctor experienced in diagnosing dementia.

      The doctor will take a full account of how the symptoms started and progressed and will want to do some brain function (cognitive) tests. It is also important to get the views of someone who knows the patient well. An MRI brain scan can be very helpful in many cases, and sometimes a special scan (SPECT or PET) of blood flow in the brain can help.

      What is the treatment for Fronto-Temporal Dementia?

      People with Fronto-Temporal Dementia need a team of specialists to help them. At the moment there are no drug treatments (although some are in the pipeline) specifically for this type of dementia.

      A main part of treatment is helping the person, and their family, understand what the diagnosis is and how it will affect them. Psychological effects (such as behaviour change) can benefit from the help of a psychologist or psychiatrist. A speech and language therapist can provide practical advice if speech is affected, and an occupational therapist can help, for example by making sure the home is safe and providing adaptations for daily tasks. Occasionally, medication such as antidepressants or tranquillisers may be needed.

      People with FTD and their families will need counselling and advice about planning for the future; for example, how to set up a Lasting Power of Attorney.

      We’re Red & Yellow Care, the
      health experts for later life.

      At Red & Yellow Care we specialise in diagnosis, treatment, care and advice for older adults. Our approach is unique – we build a complete picture of the individual – and we treat them like an individual. We guarantee fast and flexible appointments with the very best specialists.

      Meet some of our consultants.

      Dr James Warner

      Consultant Psychiatrist

      Psychiatry

      Dr Hema Ananth

      Consultant Psychiatrist

      Psychiatry

      Dr Alex Bailey

      Consultant Psychiatrist

      Psychiatry

      Dr Alan Smith

      Consultant Psychiatrist

      Psychiatry

      Dr Giovanna Zamboni

      Consultant Neurologist

      Neurology

      How we can help.

      Because we are the specialists in health for older adults, we can offer all the expertise you need from one source.

      We usually visit you at home, or alternatively can see you at our Consulting Rooms. We aim to arrange all appointments within a matter of days.

      Clear and simple pricing.


      First appointment up to 90 minutes, priced at £450.

      Further appointments at £300 up to 60 minutes, £200 up to 30 minutes.

      Home visit supplements starting from £100.

      Get started now

      Smarter, faster, easier and
      more thorough healthcare.

      Expert

      We have the best consultants and other specialists dedicated to the health of older people.

      Fast

      We aim for our specialists to see you within a matter of days, and within 24 hours for urgent appointments.

      Flexible

      We fit our service around you. Planning your appointments where and when suits you best.

      Comprehensive

      We are committed to
      giving you the most thorough assessment, treatment and care.
      prev next
      • Had a wonderful appointment with my mum. Amazed at the thoroughness and delicacy which Dr Zamboni afforded her.
        Laura – daughter and carer
      • I have got my dad back. We’ve seen massive improvements – his morning confusion is gone, he’s not forgetful or perplexed, and his motivation has improved.
        Natalie – daughter and carer
      • Gwyn Grout has been very helpful and supportive of my mother & family and has co-ordinated her care very well. She has been objective and listens well to the difficulties we have experienced.
        Michael – son and carer

        Request an appointment today.

        Vascular dementia


        Help with Vascular dementia in later life.

        Out at lunch with a friend, you suddenly can’t find the right words to say. You also find yourself fumbling with your fork. After a few minutes you’re back to normal but, over time, you notice your memory is not as sharp as it used to be. The sudden, brief loss of speech and weakness in the arm could be a sign of a mini-stroke, and this can sometimes lead to a type of dementia called vascular dementia.

        Vascular dementia is the second most common form of dementia. It is due to poor blood supply to the brain, sometimes caused by a single large stroke, sometimes by lots of mini strokes. It can even develop with no history of stroke at all.

        With well-coordinated care, people with vascular dementia can be greatly helped, and the symptoms controlled.

        Find out more about Vascular dementia

        What are the symptoms?

        There are a wide variety of symptoms depending on which parts of the brain are affected. The common symptoms are:

        • memory loss, particularly of recent events
        • difficulty finding the right words and following conversations
        • trouble with recognising people or places
        • changes in personality and behaviour
        • problems carrying out everyday tasks like cooking or driving

        What causes it?

        The brain stays healthy by receiving up to one third of the blood pumped from the heart. Reduction to the blood supply to the brain, caused by narrowing of the arteries to the brain, stroke or other reasons may result in vascular dementia.

        Key facts about vascular dementia

        • Vascular dementia is common; up to 200,000 people in the UK have it
        • It can often occur alongside Alzheimer’s disease
        • The symptoms may not progress for a long time and then get suddenly worse- known as step-wise progression
        • Looking after your heart (eg by not smoking and keeping fit) may reduce the risk of vascular dementia

        How will it affect me?

        Unlike Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia can begin quite suddenly. Vascular dementia can affect your memory, your ability to recognise people or objects, and your use of language. It can also lead to changes in personality and behaviour. You may notice changes yourself more than in other types of dementia. The confusion and memory problems may fluctuate over time so you may notice you have good days and bad days. 

        How is it diagnosed?

        Some of the symptoms of vascular dementia may also occur in other conditions (like depression, anxiety or Parkinson’s disease), so it is important to be diagnosed by a doctor with the appropriate skills.

        The doctor will begin by taking a full account of your symptoms and how they developed, how they have affected your life day-to-day and will also want to know about any medical conditions you have. In addition the doctor will want to organise some brain-function tests (called cognitive tests) and probably want you to have a brain scan. 

        How is it treated?

        Although there are no specific drug treatments recommended for vascular dementia a lot can be done to help. Sometimes the doctor may prescribe drugs normally used for Alzheimer’s disease.

        Maintaining heart health is really important. If you are a smoker, you should receive help to stop. Your blood pressure and heart rhythm should be checked. You may be advised to lose weight or exercise more. People with vascular dementia usually have other long-term medical conditions (such as type-2 diabetes, hypertension) and making sure these are carefully treated is an important part of medical management.

        Cognitive stimulation therapy is often helpful – this helps keep your brain active.

        Vascular dementia may also cause depression, anxiety, loss of motivation and sometimes hallucinations. It is important to look out for and treat these symptoms.

        For these reasons people with vascular dementia really benefit from carefully coordinated care.

        We’re Red & Yellow Care, the
        health experts for later life.

        At Red & Yellow Care we specialise in diagnosis, treatment, care and advice for older adults. Our approach is unique – we build a complete picture of the individual – and we treat them like an individual. We guarantee fast and flexible appointments with the very best specialists.

        Meet some of our consultants.

        Dr James Warner

        Consultant Psychiatrist

        Psychiatry

        Dr Hema Ananth

        Consultant Psychiatrist

        Psychiatry

        Dr Brian Parsons

        Consultant Psychiatrist

        Psychiatry

        Dr Giovanna Zamboni

        Consultant Neurologist

        Neurology

        Dr Colin Mitchell

        Consultant Geriatrician

        Geriatrics

        Dr Ioana Popescu

        Consultant Psychiatrist

        Psychiatry

        How we can help.

        Because we are the specialists in health for older adults, we can offer all the expertise you need from one source.

        We usually visit you at home, or alternatively can see you at our Consulting Rooms. We aim to arrange all appointments within a matter of days.

        Clear and simple pricing.


        First appointment up to 90 minutes, priced at £450.

        Further appointments at £300 up to 60 minutes, £200 up to 30 minutes.

        Home visit supplements starting from £100.

        Get started now

        Smarter, faster, easier and
        more thorough healthcare.

        Expert

        We have the best consultants and other specialists dedicated to the health of older people.

        Fast

        We aim for our specialists to see you within a matter of days, and within 24 hours for urgent appointments.

        Flexible

        We fit our service around you. Planning your appointments where and when suits you best.

        Comprehensive

        We are committed to
        giving you the most thorough assessment, treatment and care.
        prev next
        • The meeting on Wednesday evening eased my sore heart and deep anxiety about George, as I know how fortunate we are to have found you all.

          Teresa – sister and carer
        • Had a wonderful appointment with my mum. Amazed at the thoroughness and delicacy which Dr Zamboni afforded her.

          Laura – daughter and carer
        • John was inspired by Dr Smith, it’s been a revelation. He’s not as scared about everything, not fearing the future as much and is feeling more positive.

          Deborah – wife and carer
        • I have got my dad back. We’ve seen massive improvements – his morning confusion is gone, he’s not forgetful or perplexed, and his motivation has improved.

          Natalie – daughter and carer

          Request an appointment today.

          Young onset dementia


          Help with Young Onset Dementia.

          A colleague begins to make simple mistakes at work – they have difficulty using the phone, their behaviour is erratic, they forget appointments. It could be they are just distracted, but if the problems persist over months it could be Young Onset Dementia (YOD).

          Most of us think of Dementia as a problem for older people, but it can affect those as young as 30. Compared to Dementia in older people it has different causes – some of which may be inherited genetically – progresses in a different way and impacts people differently, especially given that they may still be at work and have young children.

          Find out more about Dementia

          What are the symptoms?

          There are a lot of different ways that young Onset Dementia can affect people. It may cause:

          • uncharacteristic behaviour such as disinhibition, irritability or apathy
          • memory loss for recent events
          • problems with spoken language
          • difficulty recognising people or objects
          • symptoms of anxiety and depression

          What causes it?

          Causes of Young Onset Dementia vary. The commonest cause is Alzheimer’s Disease, but proportionately fewer people with YOD have this compared with older adults. Vascular disease such as stroke or inflammation of the blood vessels, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease and long-term heavy alcohol use are also common causes. Around 10% have fronto-temporal dementia.

          Key Facts about Young onset dementia

          • Young Onset Dementia is defined as Dementia beginning before the age of 65
          • It may affect over 40,000 people in the UK today and could be getting more common.
          • Relative to other forms of Dementia, YOD is more often inherited genetically and passed down through families.
          • It can be difficult to diagnose because it can present in odd ways and doctors may not suspect it.
          • The specialist services for YOD are patchy in the UK

          How will it affect me?

          Many people with YOD are not aware of their problems. Families and friends may not be aware either, at first, because the condition often starts very slowly and creeps up over years.

          It can affect your ability to work; most people with YOD will eventually find it hard to hold down a job. It can also affect your ability to do daily tasks and interests such as driving, hobbies, cooking and dressing. It can also affect your family; many people with YOD have young families who have to come to terms with a parent having Dementia and losing a breadwinner.

          How is it diagnosed?

          Because of its rarity and because many of the causes are not straightforward, YOD should only be diagnosed after a very thorough assessment. This will include speaking to specialists skilled in diagnosis of this condition, ideally a neurologist and a psychiatrist working together. An MRI brain scan is essential and an amyloid brain scan or sometimes a brainwave trace called an EEG is helpful. Most people will need a neuropsychological assessment of brain function (called cognitive testing). Sometimes genetic tests may help.

          How is it treated?

          There are no cures for most causes of Young Onset Dementia. The treatment will depend on the cause. If the cause of the YOD is Alzheimer’s Disease then anti-dementia drugs like Donepezil may help. Occasionally symptoms can be helped by removal of a brain tumour, although this is very rare.

          Tackling risk factors like heart disease and heavy drinking is important. Keeping healthy by maintaining physical activity, social contacts and keeping the brain active by cognitive stimulation may also help.

          Young onset dementia often causes depression or anxiety and sometimes hallucinations. Treating these is important too.

          People with Young Onset Dementia and their families often need a lot of help and support from social services and really benefit from coordinated care by a team of doctors, psychologists, occupational therapists and other clinicians.

          We’re Red & Yellow Care, the
          health experts for later life.

          At Red & Yellow Care we specialise in diagnosis, treatment, care and advice for older adults. Our approach is unique – we build a complete picture of the individual – and we treat them like an individual. We guarantee fast and flexible appointments with the very best specialists.

          Meet some of our consultants.

          Dr James Warner

          Consultant Psychiatrist

          Psychiatry

          Dr Hema Ananth

          Consultant Psychiatrist

          Psychiatry

          Dr Alex Bailey

          Consultant Psychiatrist

          Psychiatry

          Dr Alan Smith

          Consultant Psychiatrist

          Psychiatry

          Dr Giovanna Zamboni

          Consultant Neurologist

          Neurology

          How we can help.

          Because we are the specialists in health for older adults, we can offer all the expertise you need from one source.

          We usually visit you at home, or alternatively can see you at our Consulting Rooms. We aim to arrange all appointments within a matter of days.

          Clear and simple pricing.


          First appointment up to 90 minutes, priced at £450.

          Further appointments at £300 up to 60 minutes, £200 up to 30 minutes.

          Home visit supplements starting from £100.

          Get started now

          Smarter, faster, easier and
          more thorough healthcare.

          Expert

          We have the best consultants and other specialists dedicated to the health of older people.

          Fast

          We aim for our specialists to see you within a matter of days, and within 24 hours for urgent appointments.

          Flexible

          We fit our service around you. Planning your appointments where and when suits you best.

          Comprehensive

          We are committed to
          giving you the most thorough assessment, treatment and care.

          Request an appointment today.


          prev next
          • My decisions, greatly helped by my wife, family and friends, were also sustained by the team from Red & Yellow Care.
            Bernard – person with dementia
          • The fact that you promised to tailor your service around my mother and give full and constant support was very attractive and not something we had come across previously.
            Matt – son and carer
          • Red & Yellow’s open discussions and the advice given to me and my wife were professional, friendly, patient, clear and supportive without didacticism or jargon. At all times I felt that I was part of a team, even if I was a little slow.
            Robert – person with dementia
          • I have got my dad back. We’ve seen massive improvements – his morning confusion is gone, he’s not forgetful or perplexed, and his motivation has improved.
            Natalie – daughter and carer
          • The meeting on Wednesday evening eased my sore heart and deep anxiety about George, as I know how fortunate we are to have found you all.
            Teresa – sister and carer

            Download a free PDF - A Good Life with Dementia

            Enter your email address below to receive your free copy of ‘A Good Life with Dementia’. The PDF will be delivered to your email.

            Download our free report - A Good Life with Dementia

            Alzheimer’s disease


            Alzheimer’s disease

            As we get older we all get a bit forgetful. We might know someone well, but forget their name when we meet them. If these lapses become more serious – for example we forget not just the person’s name but who they are – then this may be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease.

            Alzheimer’s disease tends to develop very slowly, starting with problems over recent memory, language use and perhaps a change in personality. It will then progress, but many people with Alzheimer’s can lead good and fulfilling lives for years after diagnosis, and there are now treatments to help with the condition.

             

            Find out more about Alzheimer’s

            What are the symptoms?

            At first you may not even realise anything is wrong. The disease usually starts slowly, progressing over many years. Each case is unique, but among the symptoms are:

            • memory loss, particularly of recent events
            • less interest in hobbies and pastimes
            • difficulty with thinking flexibly and solving problems
            • difficulty finding the right words and following conversations
            • trouble with recognising people or places
            • changes in personality and behaviour

            What causes it?

            Alzheimer’s disease is thought to be caused by the accumulation of a naturally occurring protein – Amyloid – in the brain. Amyloid appears to damage nerve cells in the brain. Why this happens isn’t yet known, but it is thought to happen many years before symptoms develop.

            Key facts about Alzheimer’s disease

            • Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia, accounting for 60% of cases. There are around 500,000 people in the UK with Alzheimer’s
            • Although many people think Alzheimer’s disease is primarily a memory problem, most people will also experience behavioural or psychological symptoms.
            • The risk increases as we get older, and the average age of diagnosis is around 75 years
            • The time between onset of symptoms and getting a diagnosis can be over 3 years.

            How will the disease affect me?

            You may not be aware of any problems and may not want help. It is others around you who notice changes. You may have problems carrying out daily tasks such as reading, cooking or driving or may do things that put you at risk. Eventually, as the disease progresses, you may become more dependent on others for help. Eventually everyone with Alzheimer’s disease will need regular help.

            How is it diagnosed?

            Some of the symptoms also occur in other conditions (like depression, anxiety or stroke), so it is important to be diagnosed by a doctor with the appropriate skills.

            Doctors will want to speak to you and also someone close to you so they can get a full picture of your problems. This includes how your symptoms developed over time, your background and current activities and support. The doctor will also do some brain-function tests that help identify what strengths you have and where you may need help. Sometimes the doctor will organise a brain scan or an assessment with a psychologist or occupational therapist although this is not necessary for everybody.

            When all the results are back the doctor will sit down with you and explain the diagnosis and what help you can be offered.

            How is it treated?

            There are drug treatments available for Alzheimer’s disease. These may help improve memory and reduce confusion. These medicines do not stop the illness but do help to reduce the effects. They do not work for everyone but for some people the effects are very good. The doctor will want to monitor how you are responding to the treatment. In addition cognitive stimulation therapy, either alone or in groups, has been shown to be as helpful as the medicines.

            Most people with Alzheimer’s disease will have additional symptoms such as feelings of depression or anxiety. Some people will have hallucinations or notice a change in behaviour. Many of these symptoms can be helped with appropriate treatment.

            People with Alzheimer’s disease and their families and friends need a lot of support, counselling and education to help them understand the diagnosis, how the illness will progress, how to plan for the future and how to get help now. A specialist should be able to put you in touch with people that can help.

            Many people with Alzheimer’s disease will eventually need help with daily activities such as cooking and dressing. An occupational therapist or physiotherapist will be able to provide advice about this.

            We’re Red & Yellow Care, the
            health experts for later life.

            At Red & Yellow Care we specialise in diagnosis, treatment, care and advice for older adults. Our approach is unique – we build a complete picture of the individual – and we treat them like an individual. We guarantee fast and flexible appointments with the very best specialists.

            Meet some of our consultants.

            Dr James Warner

            Consultant Psychiatrist

            Psychiatry

            Dr Hema Ananth

            Consultant Psychiatrist

            Psychiatry

            Dr Brian Parsons

            Consultant Psychiatrist

            Psychiatry

            Dr Giovanna Zamboni

            Consultant Neurologist

            Neurology

            Dr Colin Mitchell

            Consultant Geriatrician

            Geriatrics

            How we can help

            Because we are the specialists in health for older adults, we can offer all the expertise you need from one source.

            We usually visit you at home, or alternatively can see you at our Consulting Rooms. We aim to arrange all appointments within a matter of days.

            Clear and simple pricing.


            First appointment up to 90 minutes, priced at £450.

            Further appointments at £300 up to 60 minutes, £200 up to 30 minutes.

            Home visit supplements starting from £100.

            Get started now

            Smarter, faster, easier and
            more thorough healthcare.

            Expert

            We have the best consultants and other specialists dedicated to the health of older people.

            Fast

            We aim for our specialists to see you within a matter of days, and within 24 hours for urgent appointments.

            Flexible

            We fit our service around you. Planning your appointments where and when suits you best.

            Comprehensive

            We are committed to giving you the most thorough assessment, treatment and care.

            Request an appointment today.

            Any questions? Click here

            What is the difference between Alzheimer’s disease and dementia?

            Dementia is the term for all illnesses that cause progressive loss of brain function. Alzheimer’s disease is one form of dementia, the commonest of many.

            Will it get worse?

            It will, but only over the course of a number of years.

            Is it possible to enjoy a good life with dementia?

            It is.  Red and Yellow Care  produced an influential report in 2014, written for people  living with dementia, emphasized as much.

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            • John was inspired by Dr Smith, it’s been a revelation. He’s not as scared about everything, not fearing the future as much and is feeling more positive.

              Deborah – wife and carer
            • Red & Yellow have made a huge difference to my life. I no longer feel I am fighting a battle alone. They have given me help, guidance and the strength to support my husband.

              Rebecca – wife and carer
            • The meeting on Wednesday evening eased my sore heart and deep anxiety about George, as I know how fortunate we are to have found you all.

              Teresa – sister and carer
            • Dr Warner was amazing, we found him fantastic, and not just because the diagnosis was what we wanted. My father doesn’t always respond well to people but he responded to Dr Warner and we would all very much like to see him again.

              Anita – daughter and carer

              Want to hear more? Speak with our team now.